American Values Survey

The American Values Survey (AVS) is PRRI’s flagship product—a large national, multi-issue survey on religion, values, and public policy. The PRRI Research Team has conducted the AVS annually since 2010.

Survey | Economic Insecurity, Rising Inequality, and Doubts about the Future: Findings from the 2014 American Values Survey

[09.23.2014]

Most Americans have a decidedly negative self-evaluation of their financial situation. Roughly 4-in-10 Americans say they are currently in excellent (7%) or good (34%) shape financially, while a majority of the public report being in only fair (37%) or poor financial shape (20%). This assessment represents a notable drop from 2010, when half of Americans indicated they were in excellent (9%) or good (41%) shape financially.

Survey | 2013 American Values Survey: In Search of Libertarians in America

[10.29.2013]

Conventional wisdom may link the Tea Party movement with the libertarian arm of the Republican Party, but a PRRI survey finds that a majority of libertarians (61%) say they do not consider themselves a part of the Tea Party movement. Libertarians, who make up 7% of the adult population, also hold positions on many important economic and social issues that are distinct from the Tea Party and Republicans overall.

Survey | 2012 Post-Election American Values Survey & 2012 Ohio Values Survey

[11.15.2012]

The 2012 Post-Election American Values Survey, conducted after the 2012 presidential election, confirms that winning an overwhelming majority of white Christian votes is no longer sufficient to secure the presidency. When viewed through the lens of religion and race, Obama’s coalition resembles younger voters, while Romney’s coalition resembles older voters.

Survey | 2012 Pre-Election American Values Survey

[10.22.2012]

The 2012 American Values Pre-Election Survey finds that the outcome of the 2012 presidential election will be determined, in part, by which Catholics head to the polls. The survey also shows that the election will be influenced by how many of America’s fastest growing religious community, the religiously unaffiliated, are motivated to vote.

Survey | 2011 American Values Survey

[11.08.2011]

Executive Summary Two-thirds of voters say that it is very important (39%) or somewhat important (28%) for a presidential candidate to have strong religious beliefs. However, roughly 1-in-5 (19%) voters say they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who had strong religious beliefs if those beliefs were very different from their own. A majority of voters (53%) report that they would be somewhat or very comfortable with […]

Survey | Old Alignments, Emerging Fault Lines: Religion in the 2010 Election and Beyond

[11.17.2010]

Findings from the 2010 Post-Election American Values Survey Results of the Post-Election American Values Survey were based on 1,494 callback interviews with respondents from the Pre-election American Values Survey, which was fielded in early September 2010 among a national random sample of 3,013 adults (age 18 and older). Telephone interviews for the Post-Election American Values Survey were conducted in both English and Spanish from November 3-7, 2010. Among the top […]

Survey | Religion and the Tea Party in the 2010 Elections

[10.05.2010]

Nearly Half of Tea Party Movement also identify with Christian Conservative Movement Third Biennial American Values Survey Profiles Tea Party Movement, Religion Reveals Attitudes on Economic and Social Issues in Upcoming Elections The American Values Survey (AVS) is a large, nationally representative public opinion survey of American attitudes on religion, values, and politics. The 2010 survey is the third biennial AVS, which is conducted by PRRI every two years as […]