Published Research

Survey | Nearly 7-in-10 Americans See Unaccompanied Children at Border as Refugees, Not Illegal Immigrants

[07.29.2014]

New PRRI survey examines American attitudes on the immigration unaccompanied minors from Central America, including the causes of the immigration, as well as attitudes on the policy solutions.

Survey | Continued Majority Support for Employer Contraception Mandate, Opposition to Allowing Small Businesses to Refuse Services on Religious Grounds

[06.11.2014]

With the exception of churches and other places of worship, most Americans believe that employers should be required to provide their employees with health care plans that cover contraception at no cost. However, Americans draw distinctions based on the type and size of the employer. Opinions about the types of employers that should be required to provide health insurance that includes contraception coverage are largely unchanged from 2012.

Survey | What Americans Want From Immigration Reform in 2014

[06.10.2014]

At present, 62% of Americans favor providing a way for immigrants who are currently living in the United States illegally to become citizens provided they meet certain requirements, while 17% support allowing them to become permanent legal residents but not citizens, and roughly 1-in-5 (19%) favor a policy that would identify and deport all immigrants living in the United States illegally.

Fact Sheet | Gay and Lesbian Issues

[06.08.2014]

All the information you need about public opinion on gay marriage, DOMA, gay adoption, ENDA, and more.

Study | “I Know What You Did Last Sunday” Finds Americans Significantly Inflate Religious Participation

[05.17.2014]

A new PRRI study, “I Know What You Did Last Sunday: Measuring Social Desirability Bias in Self-Reported Religious Behavior, Belief, and Belonging,” shows that every subgroup of Americans measured over-reports their levels of religious participation, with young adults, Catholics and white mainline Protestants particularly likely to inflate the frequency of their attendance at religious services.

Fact Sheet | American Catholics

[03.21.2014]

American Catholics’ perspectives on a range of issues, as well as their opinions about church priorities and tradition.

Survey | A Shifting Landscape: A Decade of Change in American Attitudes about Same-Sex Marriage and LGBT Issues

[02.26.2014]

A major new national survey finds that since 2003, when Massachusetts became the first state to legalize gay marriage, support for allowing gay and lesbian people to marry legally has jumped 21 percentage points. A majority (53%) of Americans now support same-sex marriage, compared to less than one-third (32%) in 2003.

Book Chapter | A World of Atheism: Global Demographics

[01.31.2014]

Today, nonbelievers are estimated to comprise seven percent of the world’s population, but who are they? In a chapter for The Oxford Handbook of Atheism co-written by a PRRI research associate, the authors sketch a profile of a typical global nonbeliever: a young, educated man who’s likely to make his home in northern Europe, Japan, or communist and formerly communist nations.

Survey | Half of American Fans See Supernatural Forces at Play in Sports

[01.16.2014]

Just ahead of Super Bowl XLVIII, which will be played on February 2, 2014, a new survey finds that half of sports fans attribute some element of sports to the supernatural. These sports fans may pray to God to help their team, believe their team has been (or may be) cursed, or believe that God plays a role in determining the outcome of sporting events.

Survey | Americans Shift Preference for “Happy Holidays” over “Merry Christmas”

[12.17.2013]

In the weeks before the 2013 holiday season, a PRRI/RNS Religion News Survey sheds light on the ongoing debate about the “war on Christmas,” where some Christians contend that secular American culture is stripping the holiday of its religious content. Nearly half (49%) of Americans believe that stores and business should greet their customers with “Happy Holidays” or “Season’s Greetings” instead of “Merry Christmas.” However, a sizable minority (43%) still prefer “Merry Christmas.”