Morning Buzz | How a Donald Trump Victory Would Impact the Senate

[03.04.2016]

BuzzWelcome to the Morning Buzz, PRRI’s daily dose of religion-related news with a shot of data — because what doesn’t liven up a morning round-up like some public opinion numbers?

Republican hopefuls Ted Cruz, Donald Trump, John Kasich, and March Rubio faced off last night in the eleventh G.O.P. debate. Fox News commentators focused much of their attention on Trump, asking him repeatedly to clarify inconsistent statements he’s made.Catch up here.

Trump is inspiring the lexicographer in all of us. With the introduction of the word “Trumpmare,” Sabato’s Crystal Ball’s Larry J. Sabato and Kyle Kondik break down, as only they can, how Donald Trump’s dominance will impact the U.S. Senate, the “most vulnerable part of the GOP elective empire.” Sarah Posner also coins and explains the term “Trumpvangelicals,” or the Republican Party’s new religious force, who care less about religion and more about immigration, Islam, and guns.

A staggering new report from the Pennsylvania attorney general reveals decades of child abuse in the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown, stretching back to the 1970s and involving hundreds of children and more than 50 priests and religious leaders.

Supreme Court justices appear divided on the first abortion case to reach S.C.O.T.U.S. in over a decade; the case involves a Texas law that requires doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at local hospitals and requires abortion clinics to upgrade their facilities to meet “surgical centers” standards. Critics of the law say it could reduce the number of Texas clinics providing abortions to ten. Texans are roughly divided over whether at least some health care providers in their community should provide legal abortions or not (50 percentvs. 45 percent, respectively). Use the American Values Atlas to see where residents in your state stand.

An intimate and unique look at one expectant mother’s struggles in the only industrialized country without paid maternity leave: the U.S. More than eight in ten (82 percent) Americans — including 89 percent of Democrats and75 percent of Republicans — support requiring companies to provide all full-time employees with paid leave for the birth or adoption of a child.

And this Friday we flashback to March 6, 1951, when the Rosenberg trial began. Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were found guilty of selling nuclear secrets to Russia and sentenced to death. In a poll two years later, 76 percent of Americans approved of this sentence, while 15 percent disapproved and 9 percent offered no opinion (Source: Gallup Poll (AIPO), Feb, 1953).

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